[puredyne] LAC 2012: the Linux Audio Conference - Call for Participation

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Bruno Ruviaro Bruno Ruviaro
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[puredyne] LAC 2012: the Linux Audio Conference - Call for Participation

LAC 2012: the Linux Audio Conference - Call for Participation
April 12-15, 2012 @ CCRMA, Stanford University

http://lac.linuxaudio.org/2012/

[Apologies for cross-postings] [Please distribute]

Online submission of papers, music, installations and workshops is now open! On the website you will find up-to-date instructions, as well as important information about deadlines, travel, lodging, and so on. Read on for more details!

We invite submissions of papers addressing all areas of audio processing based on Linux and open source software. Papers can focus on technical, artistic or scientific issues and can target developers or users. We are also looking for music that has been produced or composed entirely or mostly using Linux and other Open Source music software.

The Deadline for all submissions is January 11th, 2012

The Linux Audio Conference (LAC) is an international conference that brings together musicians, sound artists, software developers and researchers, working with Linux as an open, stable, professional platform for audio and media research and music production. LAC includes paper sessions, workshops, and a diverse program of electronic music.

The upcoming 2012 conference will be hosted at CCRMA, Stanford University, on April 12-15. The Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University is a multi-disciplinary facility where composers and researchers work together using computer-based technology both as an artistic medium and as a research tool. CCRMA has been using and developing Linux as an audio platform since 1997.

http://ccrma.stanford.edu

Stanford University is located in the heart of Silicon Valley, about one hour south of San Francisco, California. This is the first time LAC will take place in the United States.

http://www.stanford.edu

We look forward to seeing you at Stanford in April!

Sincerely,

The LAC 2012 Organizing Team

---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
grant centauri grant centauri
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Re: [puredyne] LAC 2012: the Linux Audio Conference - Call for Participation

hi everyone.

i'm seriously considering submission of some audio pieces i've been
working on, but after looking at the submission form I am intrigued by
the possibility of using the spatialization setup they have available.
 however, i know almost nothing about it or how i would go about
preparing my pieces for playback on a system like that.

my work is all done with puredyne, and i thought perhaps someone on
this list would have some suggestions for a setup that can take
advantage of a multi-speaker setup.  It sounds like one system has 16
speakers and the other has 22.  There is direct diffusion as well as
"3rd order Ambisonics"... which i know nothing about.  Any insights?
Most of what i've got so far is just stereo, but i've been reading
about different spatial effects that can be realized with multiple
speakers, and when am i going to have another chance to play with a
system like this?

any advice would be great!  thanks list.  hope everyone is well.

-grant

On 10/20/11, Bruno Ruviaro <[hidden email]> wrote:

> LAC 2012: the Linux Audio Conference - Call for Participation
> April 12-15, 2012 @ CCRMA, Stanford University
>
> http://lac.linuxaudio.org/2012/
>
> [Apologies for cross-postings] [Please distribute]
>
> Online submission of papers, music, installations and workshops is now
> open! On the website you will find up-to-date instructions, as well as
> important information about deadlines, travel, lodging, and so on. Read
> on for more details!
>
> We invite submissions of papers addressing all areas of audio processing
> based on Linux and open source software. Papers can focus on technical,
> artistic or scientific issues and can target developers or users. We are
> also looking for music that has been produced or composed entirely or
> mostly using Linux and other Open Source music software.
>
> The Deadline for all submissions is January 11th, 2012
>
> The Linux Audio Conference (LAC) is an international conference that
> brings together musicians, sound artists, software developers and
> researchers, working with Linux as an open, stable, professional
> platform for audio and media research and music production. LAC includes
> paper sessions, workshops, and a diverse program of electronic music.
>
> The upcoming 2012 conference will be hosted at CCRMA, Stanford
> University, on April 12-15. The Center for Computer Research in Music
> and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University is a multi-disciplinary
> facility where composers and researchers work together using
> computer-based technology both as an artistic medium and as a research
> tool. CCRMA has been using and developing Linux as an audio platform
> since 1997.
>
> http://ccrma.stanford.edu
>
> Stanford University is located in the heart of Silicon Valley, about one
> hour south of San Francisco, California. This is the first time LAC will
> take place in the United States.
>
> http://www.stanford.edu
>
> We look forward to seeing you at Stanford in April!
>
> Sincerely,
>
> The LAC 2012 Organizing Team
>
---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
Bobby Whelan Bobby Whelan
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Re: [puredyne] LAC 2012: the Linux Audio Conference - Call for Participation

Hello Grant,

I diffused one of my pieces at the 2007-ish one in Cologne, I would
reccomend contacting the person organising the audio equipment side of
things at the venue. Obviously they will select your piece or not from
listening in stereo - so you need a stereo mix, but once they accept it
you can start preparing it for their system

- for example if they have a multichannel DAC (they probably do if they
have 16 or 22 channels), or if you could take one along and take your
piece either as a multitrack project on a laptop, or as a memory stick
of stereo stems, then you could fire them out of the individual channels
of the DAC, pre-panned in stereo pairs, and then adjust the levels of
each pair being sent to individuals/pairs/groups of speakers in order to
move individual sound-objects around the room within the piece. This
obviously depends heavily on how their system and crucially the mixer is
set up because that will be your instrument to play. So if you get lots
of info in advance of the performance you could work out a great setup.
This way you are effectively mixing for stereo whilst making the piece,
then putting it into 3d in performance, and by doing this live you can
better judge the effects of
what you are doing. its quite easy really and fun. The best tip I found
was to stick the main mix in stereo in the front pair of speakers in
front of the audience and leave it their, for weight. Then augment it
with the other speakers. That way if things do go wrong at least the
piece is still there.

I wouldnt bother with ambisonics in that situation as you have no way of
mixing the piece knowing what it will eventually sound like in the room,
so you would end up going in quite unprepared.

ramble,ramble,rant,ramble..........
Bobby.

grant centauri wrote:

> hi everyone.
>
> i'm seriously considering submission of some audio pieces i've been
> working on, but after looking at the submission form I am intrigued by
> the possibility of using the spatialization setup they have available.
>  however, i know almost nothing about it or how i would go about
> preparing my pieces for playback on a system like that.
>
> my work is all done with puredyne, and i thought perhaps someone on
> this list would have some suggestions for a setup that can take
> advantage of a multi-speaker setup.  It sounds like one system has 16
> speakers and the other has 22.  There is direct diffusion as well as
> "3rd order Ambisonics"... which i know nothing about.  Any insights?
> Most of what i've got so far is just stereo, but i've been reading
> about different spatial effects that can be realized with multiple
> speakers, and when am i going to have another chance to play with a
> system like this?
>
> any advice would be great!  thanks list.  hope everyone is well.
>
> -grant
>
> On 10/20/11, Bruno Ruviaro <[hidden email]> wrote:
>  
>> LAC 2012: the Linux Audio Conference - Call for Participation
>> April 12-15, 2012 @ CCRMA, Stanford University
>>
>> http://lac.linuxaudio.org/2012/
>>
>> [Apologies for cross-postings] [Please distribute]
>>
>> Online submission of papers, music, installations and workshops is now
>> open! On the website you will find up-to-date instructions, as well as
>> important information about deadlines, travel, lodging, and so on. Read
>> on for more details!
>>
>> We invite submissions of papers addressing all areas of audio processing
>> based on Linux and open source software. Papers can focus on technical,
>> artistic or scientific issues and can target developers or users. We are
>> also looking for music that has been produced or composed entirely or
>> mostly using Linux and other Open Source music software.
>>
>> The Deadline for all submissions is January 11th, 2012
>>
>> The Linux Audio Conference (LAC) is an international conference that
>> brings together musicians, sound artists, software developers and
>> researchers, working with Linux as an open, stable, professional
>> platform for audio and media research and music production. LAC includes
>> paper sessions, workshops, and a diverse program of electronic music.
>>
>> The upcoming 2012 conference will be hosted at CCRMA, Stanford
>> University, on April 12-15. The Center for Computer Research in Music
>> and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University is a multi-disciplinary
>> facility where composers and researchers work together using
>> computer-based technology both as an artistic medium and as a research
>> tool. CCRMA has been using and developing Linux as an audio platform
>> since 1997.
>>
>> http://ccrma.stanford.edu
>>
>> Stanford University is located in the heart of Silicon Valley, about one
>> hour south of San Francisco, California. This is the first time LAC will
>> take place in the United States.
>>
>> http://www.stanford.edu
>>
>> We look forward to seeing you at Stanford in April!
>>
>> Sincerely,
>>
>> The LAC 2012 Organizing Team
>>
>>    
> ---
> [hidden email]
> http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
>
>  

---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
Julian Brooks Julian Brooks
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Re: [puredyne] LAC 2012: the Linux Audio Conference - Call for Participation

Hey Grant,

Bit late on this and I'm not sure if it will help but here's my recent experience:

I stage managed the EA venue during ICMC2011 and was hugely impressed with the ambisonics pieces that we had (Natasha Barrett's in particular).  It did involve the composers getting distance and radii measurements of the space and the speaker config (38 speakers in approx 8 groups) but like I said the outcomes were impressive.  Now I think this has much to do with the way the pieces were composed and the pannings arranged as well, though speaking purely as a 'punter' I liked it.  Not sure in which program you have put your tunes together with but I know pd, for example, has lots of various order ambisonic stuff and I presume Ardour would do as well.

As a side note I got into asking the various composers who performed their pieces "what do you call this kind of presentation", which for me is interesting because I think of it as playing the mixing desk as a performance instrument/interface/whatever. 
The best answer came from Annette Vande Gorne
http://www.electrocd.com/en/bio/vandegorne_an/
who kicked the shit out of the desk, super impressive performance, and by this point I was calling it diffusion, as that was the most popular answer but she said she hated that term as diffusion is too weak and insipid for her.  She said that she was an 'interpreter of space'.  Yeah.

Anyway, I would be wary of getting into interpreting space without some previous experience.  Whether this means getting a rig together and just practising a lot, maybe.*  I also noticed that the hardcore amongst them would just have a stereo mixdown and would show some serious skills by throwing the mix around the room.  A lot of the composers would have an 8 channel version and could just route the tracks to the various groups and ride the faders - which would be my preferred option I think.

In the soundchecks for each piece we managed to set up the desk and save it as a preset so that each composer had the faders routed and roughly balanced to their preference so that they could get stuck in.  We also made sure that everyone had enough time to have several run-throughs to get a feel for it beforehand.  As the old mantra goes in these cicumstances - 'if you don't ask you don't get'.  So if you get a piece in make sure you get the time you need.

*Here in Huddersfield we have a wonderful rig -the HISS(Hudd Immersive Sound System) which spends probably 90% of the time in various cupboards or in pieces scattered across the University because we don't have the available space for it to reside somewhere permanently.  Such a shame as I'm sure loads of people would get a lot out of it if they could get their hands on it (me included).

All good wishes,

Julian

On 28 November 2011 01:21, Bobby Whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello Grant,

I diffused one of my pieces at the 2007-ish one in Cologne, I would reccomend contacting the person organising the audio equipment side of things at the venue. Obviously they will select your piece or not from listening in stereo - so you need a stereo mix, but once they accept it you can start preparing it for their system

- for example if they have a multichannel DAC (they probably do if they have 16 or 22 channels), or if you could take one along and take your piece either as a multitrack project on a laptop, or as a memory stick of stereo stems, then you could fire them out of the individual channels of the DAC, pre-panned in stereo pairs, and then adjust the levels of each pair being sent to individuals/pairs/groups of speakers in order to move individual sound-objects around the room within the piece. This obviously depends heavily on how their system and crucially the mixer is set up because that will be your instrument to play. So if you get lots of info in advance of the performance you could work out a great setup.
This way you are effectively mixing for stereo whilst making the piece, then putting it into 3d in performance, and by doing this live you can better judge the effects of
what you are doing. its quite easy really and fun. The best tip I found was to stick the main mix in stereo in the front pair of speakers in front of the audience and leave it their, for weight. Then augment it with the other speakers. That way if things do go wrong at least the piece is still there.

I wouldnt bother with ambisonics in that situation as you have no way of mixing the piece knowing what it will eventually sound like in the room, so you would end up going in quite unprepared.

ramble,ramble,rant,ramble..........
Bobby.


grant centauri wrote:
hi everyone.

i'm seriously considering submission of some audio pieces i've been
working on, but after looking at the submission form I am intrigued by
the possibility of using the spatialization setup they have available.
 however, i know almost nothing about it or how i would go about
preparing my pieces for playback on a system like that.

my work is all done with puredyne, and i thought perhaps someone on
this list would have some suggestions for a setup that can take
advantage of a multi-speaker setup.  It sounds like one system has 16
speakers and the other has 22.  There is direct diffusion as well as
"3rd order Ambisonics"... which i know nothing about.  Any insights?
Most of what i've got so far is just stereo, but i've been reading
about different spatial effects that can be realized with multiple
speakers, and when am i going to have another chance to play with a
system like this?

any advice would be great!  thanks list.  hope everyone is well.

-grant

On 10/20/11, Bruno Ruviaro <[hidden email]> wrote:
 
LAC 2012: the Linux Audio Conference - Call for Participation
April 12-15, 2012 @ CCRMA, Stanford University

http://lac.linuxaudio.org/2012/

[Apologies for cross-postings] [Please distribute]

Online submission of papers, music, installations and workshops is now
open! On the website you will find up-to-date instructions, as well as
important information about deadlines, travel, lodging, and so on. Read
on for more details!

We invite submissions of papers addressing all areas of audio processing
based on Linux and open source software. Papers can focus on technical,
artistic or scientific issues and can target developers or users. We are
also looking for music that has been produced or composed entirely or
mostly using Linux and other Open Source music software.

The Deadline for all submissions is January 11th, 2012

The Linux Audio Conference (LAC) is an international conference that
brings together musicians, sound artists, software developers and
researchers, working with Linux as an open, stable, professional
platform for audio and media research and music production. LAC includes
paper sessions, workshops, and a diverse program of electronic music.

The upcoming 2012 conference will be hosted at CCRMA, Stanford
University, on April 12-15. The Center for Computer Research in Music
and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University is a multi-disciplinary
facility where composers and researchers work together using
computer-based technology both as an artistic medium and as a research
tool. CCRMA has been using and developing Linux as an audio platform
since 1997.

http://ccrma.stanford.edu

Stanford University is located in the heart of Silicon Valley, about one
hour south of San Francisco, California. This is the first time LAC will
take place in the United States.

http://www.stanford.edu

We look forward to seeing you at Stanford in April!

Sincerely,

The LAC 2012 Organizing Team

   
---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne

 

---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne


---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
grant centauri grant centauri
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Re: [puredyne] LAC 2012: the Linux Audio Conference - Call for Participation

well i certainly appreciate the responses!  it helps me keep the focus where it needs to be, which is on honing the pieces i'd like to submit, then if I get accepted I can concentrate more on the possibilities of spatialization.  unfortunately, i'm really more of an amateur experimenter than an electronic music composer, so i'm not sure how it will all turn out.

Its hard to know without any experience how i'd manage to utilize the technology, but hopefully i'll get something in the conference and at least get a chance to play around. 

One more question:  I do have a PC with surround sound outputs:

Audio device: Intel Corporation 82801H (ICH8 Family) HD Audio Controller (rev 02)

Any idea if there's any way I can use that as a multichannel DAC?  Its kind of a long shot, but at least then maybe i could experiment with some Pd patches for spatialization and panning of audio.

Thanks for the support!

-grant

On Thu, Dec 1, 2011 at 9:23 AM, Julian Brooks <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hey Grant,

Bit late on this and I'm not sure if it will help but here's my recent experience:

I stage managed the EA venue during ICMC2011 and was hugely impressed with the ambisonics pieces that we had (Natasha Barrett's in particular).  It did involve the composers getting distance and radii measurements of the space and the speaker config (38 speakers in approx 8 groups) but like I said the outcomes were impressive.  Now I think this has much to do with the way the pieces were composed and the pannings arranged as well, though speaking purely as a 'punter' I liked it.  Not sure in which program you have put your tunes together with but I know pd, for example, has lots of various order ambisonic stuff and I presume Ardour would do as well.

As a side note I got into asking the various composers who performed their pieces "what do you call this kind of presentation", which for me is interesting because I think of it as playing the mixing desk as a performance instrument/interface/whatever. 
The best answer came from Annette Vande Gorne
http://www.electrocd.com/en/bio/vandegorne_an/
who kicked the shit out of the desk, super impressive performance, and by this point I was calling it diffusion, as that was the most popular answer but she said she hated that term as diffusion is too weak and insipid for her.  She said that she was an 'interpreter of space'.  Yeah.

Anyway, I would be wary of getting into interpreting space without some previous experience.  Whether this means getting a rig together and just practising a lot, maybe.*  I also noticed that the hardcore amongst them would just have a stereo mixdown and would show some serious skills by throwing the mix around the room.  A lot of the composers would have an 8 channel version and could just route the tracks to the various groups and ride the faders - which would be my preferred option I think.

In the soundchecks for each piece we managed to set up the desk and save it as a preset so that each composer had the faders routed and roughly balanced to their preference so that they could get stuck in.  We also made sure that everyone had enough time to have several run-throughs to get a feel for it beforehand.  As the old mantra goes in these cicumstances - 'if you don't ask you don't get'.  So if you get a piece in make sure you get the time you need.

*Here in Huddersfield we have a wonderful rig -the HISS(Hudd Immersive Sound System) which spends probably 90% of the time in various cupboards or in pieces scattered across the University because we don't have the available space for it to reside somewhere permanently.  Such a shame as I'm sure loads of people would get a lot out of it if they could get their hands on it (me included).

All good wishes,

Julian


On 28 November 2011 01:21, Bobby Whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello Grant,

I diffused one of my pieces at the 2007-ish one in Cologne, I would reccomend contacting the person organising the audio equipment side of things at the venue. Obviously they will select your piece or not from listening in stereo - so you need a stereo mix, but once they accept it you can start preparing it for their system

- for example if they have a multichannel DAC (they probably do if they have 16 or 22 channels), or if you could take one along and take your piece either as a multitrack project on a laptop, or as a memory stick of stereo stems, then you could fire them out of the individual channels of the DAC, pre-panned in stereo pairs, and then adjust the levels of each pair being sent to individuals/pairs/groups of speakers in order to move individual sound-objects around the room within the piece. This obviously depends heavily on how their system and crucially the mixer is set up because that will be your instrument to play. So if you get lots of info in advance of the performance you could work out a great setup.
This way you are effectively mixing for stereo whilst making the piece, then putting it into 3d in performance, and by doing this live you can better judge the effects of
what you are doing. its quite easy really and fun. The best tip I found was to stick the main mix in stereo in the front pair of speakers in front of the audience and leave it their, for weight. Then augment it with the other speakers. That way if things do go wrong at least the piece is still there.

I wouldnt bother with ambisonics in that situation as you have no way of mixing the piece knowing what it will eventually sound like in the room, so you would end up going in quite unprepared.

ramble,ramble,rant,ramble..........
Bobby.


grant centauri wrote:
hi everyone.

i'm seriously considering submission of some audio pieces i've been
working on, but after looking at the submission form I am intrigued by
the possibility of using the spatialization setup they have available.
 however, i know almost nothing about it or how i would go about
preparing my pieces for playback on a system like that.

my work is all done with puredyne, and i thought perhaps someone on
this list would have some suggestions for a setup that can take
advantage of a multi-speaker setup.  It sounds like one system has 16
speakers and the other has 22.  There is direct diffusion as well as
"3rd order Ambisonics"... which i know nothing about.  Any insights?
Most of what i've got so far is just stereo, but i've been reading
about different spatial effects that can be realized with multiple
speakers, and when am i going to have another chance to play with a
system like this?

any advice would be great!  thanks list.  hope everyone is well.

-grant

On 10/20/11, Bruno Ruviaro <[hidden email]> wrote:
 
LAC 2012: the Linux Audio Conference - Call for Participation
April 12-15, 2012 @ CCRMA, Stanford University

http://lac.linuxaudio.org/2012/

[Apologies for cross-postings] [Please distribute]

Online submission of papers, music, installations and workshops is now
open! On the website you will find up-to-date instructions, as well as
important information about deadlines, travel, lodging, and so on. Read
on for more details!

We invite submissions of papers addressing all areas of audio processing
based on Linux and open source software. Papers can focus on technical,
artistic or scientific issues and can target developers or users. We are
also looking for music that has been produced or composed entirely or
mostly using Linux and other Open Source music software.

The Deadline for all submissions is January 11th, 2012

The Linux Audio Conference (LAC) is an international conference that
brings together musicians, sound artists, software developers and
researchers, working with Linux as an open, stable, professional
platform for audio and media research and music production. LAC includes
paper sessions, workshops, and a diverse program of electronic music.

The upcoming 2012 conference will be hosted at CCRMA, Stanford
University, on April 12-15. The Center for Computer Research in Music
and Acoustics (CCRMA) at Stanford University is a multi-disciplinary
facility where composers and researchers work together using
computer-based technology both as an artistic medium and as a research
tool. CCRMA has been using and developing Linux as an audio platform
since 1997.

http://ccrma.stanford.edu

Stanford University is located in the heart of Silicon Valley, about one
hour south of San Francisco, California. This is the first time LAC will
take place in the United States.

http://www.stanford.edu

We look forward to seeing you at Stanford in April!

Sincerely,

The LAC 2012 Organizing Team

   
---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne

 

---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne


---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne


---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
KarlHungus KarlHungus
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Re: [puredyne] LAC 2012: the Linux Audio Conference - Call for Participation

hello! btw supercollider 3 is amazing for multi channel works, i often play 4ch, and 8ch live sets with it

if you want to test it:
aplay -l // to see which is your card number, mine is card 1
so i open alsamixer c1
to check if levels are not set to 0 which often happen when you connect new card, if so adjust the levels
then open your sound card in jack
look for .sclang.sc which is hidden file in home directory
open it with gedit and look for these lines
"SC_JACK_DEFAULT_OUTPUTS".setenv(
        "system:playback_1,"
        "system:playback_2"

so if you have have 5ch card add more channels

"SC_JACK_DEFAULT_OUTPUTS".setenv(
        "system:playback_1,"
        "system:playback_2,"
        "system:playback_3,"
        "system:playback_4,"
        "system:playback_5"

save it and in gedit open edit-preferences-plugins enable Sced
now under tools menu you have supercollider mode, start it
make sure that jack is running
boot the sound server - press boot in the box below called localhost server

here's some sc code to play arround
place the cursor on the code line and press ctrl-e  to evaluate code
esc    to stop
{SinOsc.ar}.play // test sound to see if your card is working

b = Buffer.read(s, "/sounds/somesound.wav"); //load some sound file
{PlayBuf.ar(2,b)}.play // like this you can play your stereo file
{PlayBuf.ar(1,b)}.play // like this you can play your stereo file in mono
{PlayBuf.ar(1,b)!5}.play  // like this you can play  file on all 5 channels
{PlayBuf.ar(1,b,[1,0.5,1.5,2,3])}.play  // 3d argument for PlayBuf is playback rate, [1,0.5,1.5,2,3] spreads sound to 5ch and every channel plays at different rate

// automated 5 ch pannning
(
{var modulator={SinOsc.kr(0.5,0,1,0)},
 sound={PlayBuf.ar(1,b)};
        PanAz.ar(5,sound,modulator)}.play; // change 5 to 22 and you will have 22 ch panner!
)

if you are interested , i can point you to some quick intro tutorials to get started
and show you some other "modes" how to manipulate panning "live" without stoping and restarting code
as i said SC is amazing for spatial stuff
good luck!