Second call on scanner to audio.

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Second call on scanner to audio.

Just wondering that you might understand me wrong the previous post.
I want to know how can I make a scanner's input data, transformed into sound?

I had some advices such as "hack the drivers" or "you can do it with puredata"

but I would really like to know how?

thanks very much

p.s.: I already use arss and enscribe software. but I want hardware stuff.
Rob Myers Rob Myers
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Re: [puredyne] Second call on scanner to audio.

On 11/11/2010 11:29 PM, esphera wrote:

>
> Just wondering that you might understand me wrong the previous post.
> I want to know how can I make a scanner's input data, transformed into
> sound?
>
> I had some advices such as "hack the drivers" or "you can do it with
> puredata"
>
> but I would really like to know how?
>
> thanks very much
>
> p.s.: I already use arss and enscribe software. but I want hardware stuff.

I don't think you'll be able to just do it with pure hardware. Every
scanner has a commmunication protocol, even old-fashioned parallel port
scanners. You need at least something like an Arduino to send the
commands the scanner is listening for to start it scanning.

Which isn't really related to pure:dyne...

- Rob.

---
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Re: [puredyne] Second call on scanner to audio.

In reply to this post by focal temporal
I don't know if this would work for sure, or if it is what you're looking for... but perhaps from the command line you could do this as root:

cat /dev/[scanner device] > /dev/dsp

similar to cat /dev/mem > /dev/dsp

all you'll get is noise, but it might do what you're looking for.

On Thu, Nov 11, 2010 at 5:29 PM, esphera <[hidden email]> wrote:

Just wondering that you might understand me wrong the previous post.
I want to know how can I make a scanner's input data, transformed into
sound?

I had some advices such as "hack the drivers" or "you can do it with
puredata"

but I would really like to know how?

thanks very much

p.s.: I already use arss and enscribe software. but I want hardware stuff.
--
View this message in context: http://puredyne.466513.n3.nabble.com/Second-call-on-scanner-to-audio-tp1886030p1886030.html
Sent from the Puredyne mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

---
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irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne


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Re: [puredyne] Second call on scanner to audio.

In reply to this post by Rob Myers
On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 23:45:13 +0000
Rob Myers <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 11/11/2010 11:29 PM, esphera wrote:
> >
> > Just wondering that you might understand me wrong the previous post.
> > I want to know how can I make a scanner's input data, transformed
> > into sound?
> >
> > I had some advices such as "hack the drivers" or "you can do it with
> > puredata"
> >
> > but I would really like to know how?
> >
> > thanks very much
> >
> > p.s.: I already use arss and enscribe software. but I want hardware
> > stuff.
>
> I don't think you'll be able to just do it with pure hardware. Every
> scanner has a commmunication protocol, even old-fashioned parallel
> port scanners. You need at least something like an Arduino to send
> the commands the scanner is listening for to start it scanning.
>
> Which isn't really related to pure:dyne...
>
> - Rob.
>
> ---
> [hidden email]
> http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne

It certainly isn't related to p:d but I thought that p:d community
would fit in this kind of project... so I ask for opinion

@grant centauri - what those commands do?

---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
grant centauri grant centauri
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Re: [puredyne] Second call on scanner to audio.

cat simply dumps the output of one thing into the standard output.  if you type cat readme.txt you'll get the whole text of the readme file pumped out into your terminal screen. if you do cat mysong.mp3 you'll get a bunch of gobbledygook flooding your terminal.

/dev/dsp is the device name of your sound card.  so if you cat the contents of a file or the output of another device you can use the redirect command, >, to send that output to /dev/dsp and you'll likely hear something.

for example i just did this command:

sudo cat audio/HumanAfterAll.wav > /dev/dsp

and i'm now listening to a sort of ringing noisy mess. 

doing:

sudo cat Desktop/americas_logo.png > /dev/dsp

gave me like 15 seconds of whitish noise.

if your scanner is a usb scanner, you can find out what device it is by plugging it in and running this command in a terminal:

dmesg | tail

I just did it with a wireless mouse device and got this info:

[17792.582043] usb 3-2: new low speed USB device using uhci_hcd and address 2
[17792.746260] usb 3-2: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
[17792.781655] input: Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse as /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:10.1/usb3/3-2/3-2:1.0/input/input6
[17792.781866] generic-usb 0003:05FE:0011.0002: input,hidraw1: USB HID v1.10 Mouse [Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse] on usb-0000:00:10.1-2/input0

i searched around my /dev directory and found this:

/dev/bus/usb/003/002

I take that as usb3-2

your machine might be different, but the usb scanner should come up as a device somewhere in /dev/bus/usb

so then you could have a terminal open, run the cat command and then control your scanner with whatever software you have on your computer to scan images or something like that. 

its not very elegant, but you might get some noise out of it.

2010/11/11 João Mário <[hidden email]>
On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 23:45:13 +0000
Rob Myers <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 11/11/2010 11:29 PM, esphera wrote:
> >
> > Just wondering that you might understand me wrong the previous post.
> > I want to know how can I make a scanner's input data, transformed
> > into sound?
> >
> > I had some advices such as "hack the drivers" or "you can do it with
> > puredata"
> >
> > but I would really like to know how?
> >
> > thanks very much
> >
> > p.s.: I already use arss and enscribe software. but I want hardware
> > stuff.
>
> I don't think you'll be able to just do it with pure hardware. Every
> scanner has a commmunication protocol, even old-fashioned parallel
> port scanners. You need at least something like an Arduino to send
> the commands the scanner is listening for to start it scanning.
>
> Which isn't really related to pure:dyne...
>
> - Rob.
>
> ---
> [hidden email]
> http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne

It certainly isn't related to p:d but I thought that p:d community
would fit in this kind of project... so I ask for opinion

@grant centauri - what those commands do?


---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
grant centauri grant centauri
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Re: [puredyne] Second call on scanner to audio.

i imagine what you really want to do is be able to somehow map data coming in from the scanner to some sort of musical or more interesting sound.  use scanner data as control data for some audio generator. 

i'm not sure how you'd manage that... i'm guessing it is possible with some level of programming knowledge.

if that is the case let me know, then we can maybe attack this at a different angle.

On Thu, Nov 11, 2010 at 6:23 PM, grant centauri <[hidden email]> wrote:
cat simply dumps the output of one thing into the standard output.  if you type cat readme.txt you'll get the whole text of the readme file pumped out into your terminal screen. if you do cat mysong.mp3 you'll get a bunch of gobbledygook flooding your terminal.

/dev/dsp is the device name of your sound card.  so if you cat the contents of a file or the output of another device you can use the redirect command, >, to send that output to /dev/dsp and you'll likely hear something.

for example i just did this command:

sudo cat audio/HumanAfterAll.wav > /dev/dsp

and i'm now listening to a sort of ringing noisy mess. 

doing:

sudo cat Desktop/americas_logo.png > /dev/dsp

gave me like 15 seconds of whitish noise.

if your scanner is a usb scanner, you can find out what device it is by plugging it in and running this command in a terminal:

dmesg | tail

I just did it with a wireless mouse device and got this info:

[17792.582043] usb 3-2: new low speed USB device using uhci_hcd and address 2
[17792.746260] usb 3-2: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
[17792.781655] input: Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse as /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:10.1/usb3/3-2/3-2:1.0/input/input6
[17792.781866] generic-usb 0003:05FE:0011.0002: input,hidraw1: USB HID v1.10 Mouse [Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse] on usb-0000:00:10.1-2/input0

i searched around my /dev directory and found this:

/dev/bus/usb/003/002

I take that as usb3-2

your machine might be different, but the usb scanner should come up as a device somewhere in /dev/bus/usb

so then you could have a terminal open, run the cat command and then control your scanner with whatever software you have on your computer to scan images or something like that. 

its not very elegant, but you might get some noise out of it.

2010/11/11 João Mário <[hidden email]>

On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 23:45:13 +0000
Rob Myers <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 11/11/2010 11:29 PM, esphera wrote:
> >
> > Just wondering that you might understand me wrong the previous post.
> > I want to know how can I make a scanner's input data, transformed
> > into sound?
> >
> > I had some advices such as "hack the drivers" or "you can do it with
> > puredata"
> >
> > but I would really like to know how?
> >
> > thanks very much
> >
> > p.s.: I already use arss and enscribe software. but I want hardware
> > stuff.
>
> I don't think you'll be able to just do it with pure hardware. Every
> scanner has a commmunication protocol, even old-fashioned parallel
> port scanners. You need at least something like an Arduino to send
> the commands the scanner is listening for to start it scanning.
>
> Which isn't really related to pure:dyne...
>
> - Rob.
>
> ---
> [hidden email]
> http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne

It certainly isn't related to p:d but I thought that p:d community
would fit in this kind of project... so I ask for opinion

@grant centauri - what those commands do?



---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
focal temporal focal temporal
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Re: [puredyne] Second call on scanner to audio.

On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 18:50:26 -0600
grant centauri <[hidden email]> wrote:

> i imagine what you really want to do is be able to somehow map data
> coming in from the scanner to some sort of musical or more
> interesting sound.  use scanner data as control data for some audio
> generator.
>
> i'm not sure how you'd manage that... i'm guessing it is possible
> with some level of programming knowledge.
>
> if that is the case let me know, then we can maybe attack this at a
> different angle.
>
> On Thu, Nov 11, 2010 at 6:23 PM, grant centauri <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> > cat simply dumps the output of one thing into the standard output.
> > if you type cat readme.txt you'll get the whole text of the readme
> > file pumped out into your terminal screen. if you do cat mysong.mp3
> > you'll get a bunch of gobbledygook flooding your terminal.
> >
> > /dev/dsp is the device name of your sound card.  so if you cat the
> > contents of a file or the output of another device you can use the
> > redirect command,
> > >, to send that output to /dev/dsp and you'll likely hear something.
> >
> > for example i just did this command:
> >
> > sudo cat audio/HumanAfterAll.wav > /dev/dsp
> >
> > and i'm now listening to a sort of ringing noisy mess.
> >
> > doing:
> >
> > sudo cat Desktop/americas_logo.png > /dev/dsp
> >
> > gave me like 15 seconds of whitish noise.
> >
> > if your scanner is a usb scanner, you can find out what device it
> > is by plugging it in and running this command in a terminal:
> >
> > dmesg | tail
> >
> > I just did it with a wireless mouse device and got this info:
> >
> > [17792.582043] usb 3-2: new low speed USB device using uhci_hcd and
> > address 2
> > [17792.746260] usb 3-2: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
> > [17792.781655] input: Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse as
> > /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:10.1/usb3/3-2/3-2:1.0/input/input6
> > [17792.781866] generic-usb 0003:05FE:0011.0002: input,hidraw1: USB
> > HID v1.10 Mouse [Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse] on
> > usb-0000:00:10.1-2/input0
> >
> > i searched around my /dev directory and found this:
> >
> > /dev/bus/usb/003/002
> >
> > I take that as usb3-2
> >
> > your machine might be different, but the usb scanner should come up
> > as a device somewhere in /dev/bus/usb
> >
> > so then you could have a terminal open, run the cat command and then
> > control your scanner with whatever software you have on your
> > computer to scan images or something like that.
> >
> > its not very elegant, but you might get some noise out of it.
> >
> > 2010/11/11 João Mário <[hidden email]>
> >
> > On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 23:45:13 +0000
> >> Rob Myers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >>
> >> > On 11/11/2010 11:29 PM, esphera wrote:
> >> > >
> >> > > Just wondering that you might understand me wrong the previous
> >> > > post. I want to know how can I make a scanner's input data,
> >> > > transformed into sound?
> >> > >
> >> > > I had some advices such as "hack the drivers" or "you can do
> >> > > it with puredata"
> >> > >
> >> > > but I would really like to know how?
> >> > >
> >> > > thanks very much
> >> > >
> >> > > p.s.: I already use arss and enscribe software. but I want
> >> > > hardware stuff.
> >> >
> >> > I don't think you'll be able to just do it with pure hardware.
> >> > Every scanner has a commmunication protocol, even old-fashioned
> >> > parallel port scanners. You need at least something like an
> >> > Arduino to send the commands the scanner is listening for to
> >> > start it scanning.
> >> >
> >> > Which isn't really related to pure:dyne...
> >> >
> >> > - Rob.
> >> >
> >> > ---
> >> > [hidden email]
> >> > http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> >> > irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> >>
> >> It certainly isn't related to p:d but I thought that p:d community
> >> would fit in this kind of project... so I ask for opinion
> >>
> >> @grant centauri - what those commands do?
> >>
> >> ---
> >> [hidden email]
> >> http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> >> irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> >>
> >
> >

yes it's exactly that! :) like arss or enscribe (maybe this software
can be taken as study?..)
I don't know as I'm from image and type cult rather than programming. I
do have a strong and growing interest in electronics and programming
thanks to puredyne! and I would like very much to see this work as a
kind of instrument with some controls over the speed of scan light or
sensitivity... I want to go that way if you read me. probably with pd
and some midi controllers?

---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
grant centauri grant centauri
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Re: [puredyne] Second call on scanner to audio.

okay, i think i have a better idea now of what you are going for.  i can't really offer a quick solution, but it will likely involve programming.  I think you're better off trying to start with a web cam or something like that as an input device.  I know that processing has libraries for accessing camera devices, I'm sure Pd probably does too... then its a matter of mapping graphical data to sound. 

it seems like the software you're looking at, arss amd enscribe are mapping visual data to audio frequency data.  each one probably uses a different technique and method of mapping to get the sounds out of an image.  here's what enscribe does:

The scanlines of the input image are converted into frequency components and then using an inverse Fast Fourier Transform, are converted into sound. The left side of the image is the low frequency end, and the right is the high end, up to just under the Nyquist limit if you want it.

there's a whole world out there of people doing this kind of stuff, I just found this:

I think any discussion of "transcoding" image (or other data) into sound has to take into account that such mapping is purely subjective. The artistry is in finding meaningful transpositions from one medium to another. Using "raw" data as sample values is certainly one way, and using an image as spectrographic values for resynthesis is certainly another. There are certainly enough softwares out there that do either trick, and those sounds are familiar to us from the many many artists who have used those softs already (to death in some cases). Dig a little deeper and decide for yourself the relationship of pixel to sample instead of relying on other people's ready-mades and you might be on to something new.

Basically, any image source used as a sound source is a matter of deciding how the data gets mapped.  A good place to start would probably be for you to design a mapping method for static images that makes sounds you like, and then explore various images and patterns that produce sound.  you could likely do this in Pd, but i'm not familiar enough with it to know how.

I know in the old days people used to 'animate' sound.  Films had the audio soundtrack actually printed on them as a waveform and a photo sensor would read that data to reproduce audio electronically.  Some animators started drawing their own patterns of light and dark in order to synthesize sound directly onto film. 

I don't want to discourage your idea, i do think it is an interesting one... i'm imagining a scanner that you can set different images on to get different sounds, or control the speed and light sensitivity as you said... it could be pretty neat.  but i think it might be an uphill battle, and there's probably other ways you could put your graphical background to work making digital sound.

-grant



2010/11/12 João Mário <[hidden email]>
On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 18:50:26 -0600
grant centauri <[hidden email]> wrote:

> i imagine what you really want to do is be able to somehow map data
> coming in from the scanner to some sort of musical or more
> interesting sound.  use scanner data as control data for some audio
> generator.
>
> i'm not sure how you'd manage that... i'm guessing it is possible
> with some level of programming knowledge.
>
> if that is the case let me know, then we can maybe attack this at a
> different angle.
>
> On Thu, Nov 11, 2010 at 6:23 PM, grant centauri <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>
> > cat simply dumps the output of one thing into the standard output.
> > if you type cat readme.txt you'll get the whole text of the readme
> > file pumped out into your terminal screen. if you do cat mysong.mp3
> > you'll get a bunch of gobbledygook flooding your terminal.
> >
> > /dev/dsp is the device name of your sound card.  so if you cat the
> > contents of a file or the output of another device you can use the
> > redirect command,
> > >, to send that output to /dev/dsp and you'll likely hear something.
> >
> > for example i just did this command:
> >
> > sudo cat audio/HumanAfterAll.wav > /dev/dsp
> >
> > and i'm now listening to a sort of ringing noisy mess.
> >
> > doing:
> >
> > sudo cat Desktop/americas_logo.png > /dev/dsp
> >
> > gave me like 15 seconds of whitish noise.
> >
> > if your scanner is a usb scanner, you can find out what device it
> > is by plugging it in and running this command in a terminal:
> >
> > dmesg | tail
> >
> > I just did it with a wireless mouse device and got this info:
> >
> > [17792.582043] usb 3-2: new low speed USB device using uhci_hcd and
> > address 2
> > [17792.746260] usb 3-2: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
> > [17792.781655] input: Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse as
> > /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:10.1/usb3/3-2/3-2:1.0/input/input6
> > [17792.781866] generic-usb 0003:05FE:0011.0002: input,hidraw1: USB
> > HID v1.10 Mouse [Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse] on
> > usb-0000:00:10.1-2/input0
> >
> > i searched around my /dev directory and found this:
> >
> > /dev/bus/usb/003/002
> >
> > I take that as usb3-2
> >
> > your machine might be different, but the usb scanner should come up
> > as a device somewhere in /dev/bus/usb
> >
> > so then you could have a terminal open, run the cat command and then
> > control your scanner with whatever software you have on your
> > computer to scan images or something like that.
> >
> > its not very elegant, but you might get some noise out of it.
> >
> > 2010/11/11 João Mário <[hidden email]>
> >
> > On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 23:45:13 +0000
> >> Rob Myers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >>
> >> > On 11/11/2010 11:29 PM, esphera wrote:
> >> > >
> >> > > Just wondering that you might understand me wrong the previous
> >> > > post. I want to know how can I make a scanner's input data,
> >> > > transformed into sound?
> >> > >
> >> > > I had some advices such as "hack the drivers" or "you can do
> >> > > it with puredata"
> >> > >
> >> > > but I would really like to know how?
> >> > >
> >> > > thanks very much
> >> > >
> >> > > p.s.: I already use arss and enscribe software. but I want
> >> > > hardware stuff.
> >> >
> >> > I don't think you'll be able to just do it with pure hardware.
> >> > Every scanner has a commmunication protocol, even old-fashioned
> >> > parallel port scanners. You need at least something like an
> >> > Arduino to send the commands the scanner is listening for to
> >> > start it scanning.
> >> >
> >> > Which isn't really related to pure:dyne...
> >> >
> >> > - Rob.
> >> >
> >> > ---
> >> > [hidden email]
> >> > http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> >> > irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> >>
> >> It certainly isn't related to p:d but I thought that p:d community
> >> would fit in this kind of project... so I ask for opinion
> >>
> >> @grant centauri - what those commands do?
> >>
> >> ---
> >> [hidden email]
> >> http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> >> irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> >>
> >
> >

yes it's exactly that! :) like arss or enscribe (maybe this software
can be taken as study?..)
I don't know as I'm from image and type cult rather than programming. I
do have a strong and growing interest in electronics and programming
thanks to puredyne! and I would like very much to see this work as a
kind of instrument with some controls over the speed of scan light or
sensitivity... I want to go that way if you read me. probably with pd
and some midi controllers?


---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
focal temporal focal temporal
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Re: [puredyne] Second call on scanner to audio.

On Fri, 12 Nov 2010 16:25:56 -0600
grant centauri <[hidden email]> wrote:

> okay, i think i have a better idea now of what you are going for.  i
> can't really offer a quick solution, but it will likely involve
> programming.  I think you're better off trying to start with a web
> cam or something like that as an input device.  I know that
> processing has libraries for accessing camera devices, I'm sure Pd
> probably does too... then its a matter of mapping graphical data to
> sound.
>
> it seems like the software you're looking at, arss amd enscribe are
> mapping visual data to audio frequency data.  each one probably uses
> a different technique and method of mapping to get the sounds out of
> an image.  here's what enscribe does:
>
> The scanlines of the input image are converted into frequency
> components and
> > then using an inverse Fast Fourier Transform, are converted into
> > sound. The left side of the image is the low frequency end, and the
> > right is the high end, up to just under the Nyquist limit if you
> > want it.
> >
>
> there's a whole world out there of people doing this kind of stuff, I
> just found this:
>
> I think any discussion of "transcoding" image (or other data) into
> sound has to take into account that such mapping is purely
> subjective. The artistry is in finding meaningful transpositions from
> one medium to another. Using "raw" data as sample values is certainly
> one way, and using an image as spectrographic values for resynthesis
> is certainly another. There are certainly enough softwares out there
> that do either trick, and those sounds are familiar to us from the
> many many artists who have used those softs already (to death in some
> cases). Dig a little deeper and decide for yourself the relationship
> of pixel to sample instead of relying on other people's ready-mades
> and you might be on to something new.
>
> Basically, any image source used as a sound source is a matter of
> deciding how the data gets mapped.  A good place to start would
> probably be for you to design a mapping method for static images that
> makes sounds you like, and then explore various images and patterns
> that produce sound.  you could likely do this in Pd, but i'm not
> familiar enough with it to know how.
>
> I know in the old days people used to 'animate' sound.  Films had the
> audio soundtrack actually printed on them as a waveform and a photo
> sensor would read that data to reproduce audio electronically.  Some
> animators started drawing their own patterns of light and dark in
> order to synthesize sound directly onto film.
>
> I don't want to discourage your idea, i do think it is an interesting
> one... i'm imagining a scanner that you can set different images on
> to get different sounds, or control the speed and light sensitivity
> as you said... it could be pretty neat.  but i think it might be an
> uphill battle, and there's probably other ways you could put your
> graphical background to work making digital sound.
>
> -grant
>
>
>
> 2010/11/12 João Mário <[hidden email]>
>
> > On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 18:50:26 -0600
> > grant centauri <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > > i imagine what you really want to do is be able to somehow map
> > > data coming in from the scanner to some sort of musical or more
> > > interesting sound.  use scanner data as control data for some
> > > audio generator.
> > >
> > > i'm not sure how you'd manage that... i'm guessing it is possible
> > > with some level of programming knowledge.
> > >
> > > if that is the case let me know, then we can maybe attack this at
> > > a different angle.
> > >
> > > On Thu, Nov 11, 2010 at 6:23 PM, grant centauri
> > > <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > >
> > > > cat simply dumps the output of one thing into the standard
> > > > output. if you type cat readme.txt you'll get the whole text of
> > > > the readme file pumped out into your terminal screen. if you do
> > > > cat mysong.mp3 you'll get a bunch of gobbledygook flooding your
> > > > terminal.
> > > >
> > > > /dev/dsp is the device name of your sound card.  so if you cat
> > > > the contents of a file or the output of another device you can
> > > > use the redirect command,
> > > > >, to send that output to /dev/dsp and you'll likely hear
> > > > >something.
> > > >
> > > > for example i just did this command:
> > > >
> > > > sudo cat audio/HumanAfterAll.wav > /dev/dsp
> > > >
> > > > and i'm now listening to a sort of ringing noisy mess.
> > > >
> > > > doing:
> > > >
> > > > sudo cat Desktop/americas_logo.png > /dev/dsp
> > > >
> > > > gave me like 15 seconds of whitish noise.
> > > >
> > > > if your scanner is a usb scanner, you can find out what device
> > > > it is by plugging it in and running this command in a terminal:
> > > >
> > > > dmesg | tail
> > > >
> > > > I just did it with a wireless mouse device and got this info:
> > > >
> > > > [17792.582043] usb 3-2: new low speed USB device using uhci_hcd
> > > > and address 2
> > > > [17792.746260] usb 3-2: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
> > > > [17792.781655] input: Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse as
> > > > /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:10.1/usb3/3-2/3-2:1.0/input/input6
> > > > [17792.781866] generic-usb 0003:05FE:0011.0002: input,hidraw1:
> > > > USB HID v1.10 Mouse [Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse] on
> > > > usb-0000:00:10.1-2/input0
> > > >
> > > > i searched around my /dev directory and found this:
> > > >
> > > > /dev/bus/usb/003/002
> > > >
> > > > I take that as usb3-2
> > > >
> > > > your machine might be different, but the usb scanner should
> > > > come up as a device somewhere in /dev/bus/usb
> > > >
> > > > so then you could have a terminal open, run the cat command and
> > > > then control your scanner with whatever software you have on
> > > > your computer to scan images or something like that.
> > > >
> > > > its not very elegant, but you might get some noise out of it.
> > > >
> > > > 2010/11/11 João Mário <[hidden email]>
> > > >
> > > > On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 23:45:13 +0000
> > > >> Rob Myers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > > >>
> > > >> > On 11/11/2010 11:29 PM, esphera wrote:
> > > >> > >
> > > >> > > Just wondering that you might understand me wrong the
> > > >> > > previous post. I want to know how can I make a scanner's
> > > >> > > input data, transformed into sound?
> > > >> > >
> > > >> > > I had some advices such as "hack the drivers" or "you can
> > > >> > > do it with puredata"
> > > >> > >
> > > >> > > but I would really like to know how?
> > > >> > >
> > > >> > > thanks very much
> > > >> > >
> > > >> > > p.s.: I already use arss and enscribe software. but I want
> > > >> > > hardware stuff.
> > > >> >
> > > >> > I don't think you'll be able to just do it with pure
> > > >> > hardware. Every scanner has a commmunication protocol, even
> > > >> > old-fashioned parallel port scanners. You need at least
> > > >> > something like an Arduino to send the commands the scanner
> > > >> > is listening for to start it scanning.
> > > >> >
> > > >> > Which isn't really related to pure:dyne...
> > > >> >
> > > >> > - Rob.
> > > >> >
> > > >> > ---
> > > >> > [hidden email]
> > > >> > http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> > > >> > irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> > > >>
> > > >> It certainly isn't related to p:d but I thought that p:d
> > > >> community would fit in this kind of project... so I ask for
> > > >> opinion
> > > >>
> > > >> @grant centauri - what those commands do?
> > > >>
> > > >> ---
> > > >> [hidden email]
> > > >> http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> > > >> irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> > > >>
> > > >
> > > >
> >
> > yes it's exactly that! :) like arss or enscribe (maybe this software
> > can be taken as study?..)
> > I don't know as I'm from image and type cult rather than
> > programming. I do have a strong and growing interest in electronics
> > and programming thanks to puredyne! and I would like very much to
> > see this work as a kind of instrument with some controls
> > over the speed of scan light or sensitivity... I want to go that
> > way if you read me. probably with pd and some midi controllers?
> >
> > ---
> > [hidden email]
> > http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> > irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> >

hey man thanks for your time!

you really did touch the G point, the question of how data is mapped
has been revolving on my head. But then I think that the image as
spectogram is nice for what i'm looking for because I want to actually
see what kind of imagery makes what kind of sound (so that my
images production affects sound production and viceversa) but then urges
another question: I think the synthesis type is the thing that i'm
missing in understanding. arss uses both sine and noise synthesis.
enscribe i'm not sure. I got in touch with the creator and all he said
to me was :

"A lot more time and energy has gone into ARSS, I think they use
additive synthesis instead of iFFT, so the architectures are completely
different. enscribe was never intended for synthesis, just as a way to
hide images inside songs.

http://photosounder.com/examples.php also looks pretty cool, and  
there's a free demo."

What I said to him was that I like arss's the most for the kind of
clean sound results that it produced, but enscribe offers color mapping
related to panning and stuff, and that a fusion of both would be
perfect. But, I can't do it and i don't have the time to study about it.

So concluding this tought, I want to know what kind of synthesis is
more "pure" to what i'm looking for as a kind of synesthesia thing you
see?

Thanks a lot one more time for your time! I really expect more ideas :)

---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
grant centauri grant centauri
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Re: [puredyne] Second call on scanner to audio.

i checked out photosounder, it looked pretty awesome.  its weird, while we were discussing this earlier, i essentially thought of the program arss and was trying to figure out how it would work.  you could essentially store any kind of data as sound, then like play the sound into a microphone to reproduce what you stored. 

perhaps we should make this some kind of puredyne americas project to work on.  i've been doing some research into granular synthesis and representations of sound.  i think a sort of pixel to grain map scheme could make a pretty neat instrument.  you'd control a matrix of pixels which would have correlations to various elements of granular sound.  i can actually envision a lot of things you could do with this, and with granular sound you could essentially have an endless pallete of timbre/texture... and you could control traditional musical elements with more basic control over pitch/envelope/ or whatever...

anyways, its definitely a possibility, it just depends on the way you want to go i guess.  i'm not sure if we have the resources to make something quickly, but i do believe the tools are there to do what you want to do, and there are various ways you could realize a link between visual and audible data.

-grant

2010/11/13 João Mário <[hidden email]>
On Fri, 12 Nov 2010 16:25:56 -0600
grant centauri <[hidden email]> wrote:

> okay, i think i have a better idea now of what you are going for.  i
> can't really offer a quick solution, but it will likely involve
> programming.  I think you're better off trying to start with a web
> cam or something like that as an input device.  I know that
> processing has libraries for accessing camera devices, I'm sure Pd
> probably does too... then its a matter of mapping graphical data to
> sound.
>
> it seems like the software you're looking at, arss amd enscribe are
> mapping visual data to audio frequency data.  each one probably uses
> a different technique and method of mapping to get the sounds out of
> an image.  here's what enscribe does:
>
> The scanlines of the input image are converted into frequency
> components and
> > then using an inverse Fast Fourier Transform, are converted into
> > sound. The left side of the image is the low frequency end, and the
> > right is the high end, up to just under the Nyquist limit if you
> > want it.
> >
>
> there's a whole world out there of people doing this kind of stuff, I
> just found this:
>
> I think any discussion of "transcoding" image (or other data) into
> sound has to take into account that such mapping is purely
> subjective. The artistry is in finding meaningful transpositions from
> one medium to another. Using "raw" data as sample values is certainly
> one way, and using an image as spectrographic values for resynthesis
> is certainly another. There are certainly enough softwares out there
> that do either trick, and those sounds are familiar to us from the
> many many artists who have used those softs already (to death in some
> cases). Dig a little deeper and decide for yourself the relationship
> of pixel to sample instead of relying on other people's ready-mades
> and you might be on to something new.
>
> Basically, any image source used as a sound source is a matter of
> deciding how the data gets mapped.  A good place to start would
> probably be for you to design a mapping method for static images that
> makes sounds you like, and then explore various images and patterns
> that produce sound.  you could likely do this in Pd, but i'm not
> familiar enough with it to know how.
>
> I know in the old days people used to 'animate' sound.  Films had the
> audio soundtrack actually printed on them as a waveform and a photo
> sensor would read that data to reproduce audio electronically.  Some
> animators started drawing their own patterns of light and dark in
> order to synthesize sound directly onto film.
>
> I don't want to discourage your idea, i do think it is an interesting
> one... i'm imagining a scanner that you can set different images on
> to get different sounds, or control the speed and light sensitivity
> as you said... it could be pretty neat.  but i think it might be an
> uphill battle, and there's probably other ways you could put your
> graphical background to work making digital sound.
>
> -grant
>
>
>
> 2010/11/12 João Mário <[hidden email]>
>
> > On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 18:50:26 -0600
> > grant centauri <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > > i imagine what you really want to do is be able to somehow map
> > > data coming in from the scanner to some sort of musical or more
> > > interesting sound.  use scanner data as control data for some
> > > audio generator.
> > >
> > > i'm not sure how you'd manage that... i'm guessing it is possible
> > > with some level of programming knowledge.
> > >
> > > if that is the case let me know, then we can maybe attack this at
> > > a different angle.
> > >
> > > On Thu, Nov 11, 2010 at 6:23 PM, grant centauri
> > > <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > >
> > > > cat simply dumps the output of one thing into the standard
> > > > output. if you type cat readme.txt you'll get the whole text of
> > > > the readme file pumped out into your terminal screen. if you do
> > > > cat mysong.mp3 you'll get a bunch of gobbledygook flooding your
> > > > terminal.
> > > >
> > > > /dev/dsp is the device name of your sound card.  so if you cat
> > > > the contents of a file or the output of another device you can
> > > > use the redirect command,
> > > > >, to send that output to /dev/dsp and you'll likely hear
> > > > >something.
> > > >
> > > > for example i just did this command:
> > > >
> > > > sudo cat audio/HumanAfterAll.wav > /dev/dsp
> > > >
> > > > and i'm now listening to a sort of ringing noisy mess.
> > > >
> > > > doing:
> > > >
> > > > sudo cat Desktop/americas_logo.png > /dev/dsp
> > > >
> > > > gave me like 15 seconds of whitish noise.
> > > >
> > > > if your scanner is a usb scanner, you can find out what device
> > > > it is by plugging it in and running this command in a terminal:
> > > >
> > > > dmesg | tail
> > > >
> > > > I just did it with a wireless mouse device and got this info:
> > > >
> > > > [17792.582043] usb 3-2: new low speed USB device using uhci_hcd
> > > > and address 2
> > > > [17792.746260] usb 3-2: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
> > > > [17792.781655] input: Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse as
> > > > /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:10.1/usb3/3-2/3-2:1.0/input/input6
> > > > [17792.781866] generic-usb 0003:05FE:0011.0002: input,hidraw1:
> > > > USB HID v1.10 Mouse [Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse] on
> > > > usb-0000:00:10.1-2/input0
> > > >
> > > > i searched around my /dev directory and found this:
> > > >
> > > > /dev/bus/usb/003/002
> > > >
> > > > I take that as usb3-2
> > > >
> > > > your machine might be different, but the usb scanner should
> > > > come up as a device somewhere in /dev/bus/usb
> > > >
> > > > so then you could have a terminal open, run the cat command and
> > > > then control your scanner with whatever software you have on
> > > > your computer to scan images or something like that.
> > > >
> > > > its not very elegant, but you might get some noise out of it.
> > > >
> > > > 2010/11/11 João Mário <[hidden email]>
> > > >
> > > > On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 23:45:13 +0000
> > > >> Rob Myers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > > >>
> > > >> > On 11/11/2010 11:29 PM, esphera wrote:
> > > >> > >
> > > >> > > Just wondering that you might understand me wrong the
> > > >> > > previous post. I want to know how can I make a scanner's
> > > >> > > input data, transformed into sound?
> > > >> > >
> > > >> > > I had some advices such as "hack the drivers" or "you can
> > > >> > > do it with puredata"
> > > >> > >
> > > >> > > but I would really like to know how?
> > > >> > >
> > > >> > > thanks very much
> > > >> > >
> > > >> > > p.s.: I already use arss and enscribe software. but I want
> > > >> > > hardware stuff.
> > > >> >
> > > >> > I don't think you'll be able to just do it with pure
> > > >> > hardware. Every scanner has a commmunication protocol, even
> > > >> > old-fashioned parallel port scanners. You need at least
> > > >> > something like an Arduino to send the commands the scanner
> > > >> > is listening for to start it scanning.
> > > >> >
> > > >> > Which isn't really related to pure:dyne...
> > > >> >
> > > >> > - Rob.
> > > >> >
> > > >> > ---
> > > >> > [hidden email]
> > > >> > http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> > > >> > irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> > > >>
> > > >> It certainly isn't related to p:d but I thought that p:d
> > > >> community would fit in this kind of project... so I ask for
> > > >> opinion
> > > >>
> > > >> @grant centauri - what those commands do?
> > > >>
> > > >> ---
> > > >> [hidden email]
> > > >> http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> > > >> irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> > > >>
> > > >
> > > >
> >
> > yes it's exactly that! :) like arss or enscribe (maybe this software
> > can be taken as study?..)
> > I don't know as I'm from image and type cult rather than
> > programming. I do have a strong and growing interest in electronics
> > and programming thanks to puredyne! and I would like very much to
> > see this work as a kind of instrument with some controls
> > over the speed of scan light or sensitivity... I want to go that
> > way if you read me. probably with pd and some midi controllers?
> >
> > ---
> > [hidden email]
> > http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> > irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> >

hey man thanks for your time!

you really did touch the G point, the question of how data is mapped
has been revolving on my head. But then I think that the image as
spectogram is nice for what i'm looking for because I want to actually
see what kind of imagery makes what kind of sound (so that my
images production affects sound production and viceversa) but then urges
another question: I think the synthesis type is the thing that i'm
missing in understanding. arss uses both sine and noise synthesis.
enscribe i'm not sure. I got in touch with the creator and all he said
to me was :

"A lot more time and energy has gone into ARSS, I think they use
additive synthesis instead of iFFT, so the architectures are completely
different. enscribe was never intended for synthesis, just as a way to
hide images inside songs.

http://photosounder.com/examples.php also looks pretty cool, and
there's a free demo."

What I said to him was that I like arss's the most for the kind of
clean sound results that it produced, but enscribe offers color mapping
related to panning and stuff, and that a fusion of both would be
perfect. But, I can't do it and i don't have the time to study about it.

So concluding this tought, I want to know what kind of synthesis is
more "pure" to what i'm looking for as a kind of synesthesia thing you
see?

Thanks a lot one more time for your time! I really expect more ideas :)


---
[hidden email]
http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
focal temporal focal temporal
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Re: [puredyne] Second call on scanner to audio.

On Sun, 14 Nov 2010 12:32:51 -0600
grant centauri <[hidden email]> wrote:

> i checked out photosounder, it looked pretty awesome.  its weird,
> while we were discussing this earlier, i essentially thought of the
> program arss and was trying to figure out how it would work.  you
> could essentially store any kind of data as sound, then like play the
> sound into a microphone to reproduce what you stored.
>
> perhaps we should make this some kind of puredyne americas project to
> work on.  i've been doing some research into granular synthesis and
> representations of sound.  i think a sort of pixel to grain map
> scheme could make a pretty neat instrument.  you'd control a matrix
> of pixels which would have correlations to various elements of
> granular sound.  i can actually envision a lot of things you could do
> with this, and with granular sound you could essentially have an
> endless pallete of timbre/texture... and you could control
> traditional musical elements with more basic control over
> pitch/envelope/ or whatever...
>
> anyways, its definitely a possibility, it just depends on the way you
> want to go i guess.  i'm not sure if we have the resources to make
> something quickly, but i do believe the tools are there to do what
> you want to do, and there are various ways you could realize a link
> between visual and audible data.
>
> -grant
>
> 2010/11/13 João Mário <[hidden email]>
>
> > On Fri, 12 Nov 2010 16:25:56 -0600
> > grant centauri <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > > okay, i think i have a better idea now of what you are going
> > > for.  i can't really offer a quick solution, but it will likely
> > > involve programming.  I think you're better off trying to start
> > > with a web cam or something like that as an input device.  I know
> > > that processing has libraries for accessing camera devices, I'm
> > > sure Pd probably does too... then its a matter of mapping
> > > graphical data to sound.
> > >
> > > it seems like the software you're looking at, arss amd enscribe
> > > are mapping visual data to audio frequency data.  each one
> > > probably uses a different technique and method of mapping to get
> > > the sounds out of an image.  here's what enscribe does:
> > >
> > > The scanlines of the input image are converted into frequency
> > > components and
> > > > then using an inverse Fast Fourier Transform, are converted into
> > > > sound. The left side of the image is the low frequency end, and
> > > > the right is the high end, up to just under the Nyquist limit
> > > > if you want it.
> > > >
> > >
> > > there's a whole world out there of people doing this kind of
> > > stuff, I just found this:
> > >
> > > I think any discussion of "transcoding" image (or other data) into
> > > sound has to take into account that such mapping is purely
> > > subjective. The artistry is in finding meaningful transpositions
> > > from one medium to another. Using "raw" data as sample values is
> > > certainly one way, and using an image as spectrographic values
> > > for resynthesis is certainly another. There are certainly enough
> > > softwares out there that do either trick, and those sounds are
> > > familiar to us from the many many artists who have used those
> > > softs already (to death in some cases). Dig a little deeper and
> > > decide for yourself the relationship of pixel to sample instead
> > > of relying on other people's ready-mades and you might be on to
> > > something new.
> > >
> > > Basically, any image source used as a sound source is a matter of
> > > deciding how the data gets mapped.  A good place to start would
> > > probably be for you to design a mapping method for static images
> > > that makes sounds you like, and then explore various images and
> > > patterns that produce sound.  you could likely do this in Pd, but
> > > i'm not familiar enough with it to know how.
> > >
> > > I know in the old days people used to 'animate' sound.  Films had
> > > the audio soundtrack actually printed on them as a waveform and a
> > > photo sensor would read that data to reproduce audio
> > > electronically.  Some animators started drawing their own
> > > patterns of light and dark in order to synthesize sound directly
> > > onto film.
> > >
> > > I don't want to discourage your idea, i do think it is an
> > > interesting one... i'm imagining a scanner that you can set
> > > different images on to get different sounds, or control the speed
> > > and light sensitivity as you said... it could be pretty neat.
> > > but i think it might be an uphill battle, and there's probably
> > > other ways you could put your graphical background to work making
> > > digital sound.
> > >
> > > -grant
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > 2010/11/12 João Mário <[hidden email]>
> > >
> > > > On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 18:50:26 -0600
> > > > grant centauri <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > i imagine what you really want to do is be able to somehow map
> > > > > data coming in from the scanner to some sort of musical or
> > > > > more interesting sound.  use scanner data as control data for
> > > > > some audio generator.
> > > > >
> > > > > i'm not sure how you'd manage that... i'm guessing it is
> > > > > possible with some level of programming knowledge.
> > > > >
> > > > > if that is the case let me know, then we can maybe attack
> > > > > this at a different angle.
> > > > >
> > > > > On Thu, Nov 11, 2010 at 6:23 PM, grant centauri
> > > > > <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > > cat simply dumps the output of one thing into the standard
> > > > > > output. if you type cat readme.txt you'll get the whole
> > > > > > text of the readme file pumped out into your terminal
> > > > > > screen. if you do cat mysong.mp3 you'll get a bunch of
> > > > > > gobbledygook flooding your terminal.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > /dev/dsp is the device name of your sound card.  so if you
> > > > > > cat the contents of a file or the output of another device
> > > > > > you can use the redirect command,
> > > > > > >, to send that output to /dev/dsp and you'll likely hear
> > > > > > >something.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > for example i just did this command:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > sudo cat audio/HumanAfterAll.wav > /dev/dsp
> > > > > >
> > > > > > and i'm now listening to a sort of ringing noisy mess.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > doing:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > sudo cat Desktop/americas_logo.png > /dev/dsp
> > > > > >
> > > > > > gave me like 15 seconds of whitish noise.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > if your scanner is a usb scanner, you can find out what
> > > > > > device it is by plugging it in and running this command in
> > > > > > a terminal:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > dmesg | tail
> > > > > >
> > > > > > I just did it with a wireless mouse device and got this
> > > > > > info:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > [17792.582043] usb 3-2: new low speed USB device using
> > > > > > uhci_hcd and address 2
> > > > > > [17792.746260] usb 3-2: configuration #1 chosen from 1
> > > > > > choice [17792.781655] input: Wireless Mouse Wireless Mouse
> > > > > > as /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:10.1/usb3/3-2/3-2:1.0/input/input6
> > > > > > [17792.781866] generic-usb 0003:05FE:0011.0002:
> > > > > > input,hidraw1: USB HID v1.10 Mouse [Wireless Mouse Wireless
> > > > > > Mouse] on usb-0000:00:10.1-2/input0
> > > > > >
> > > > > > i searched around my /dev directory and found this:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > /dev/bus/usb/003/002
> > > > > >
> > > > > > I take that as usb3-2
> > > > > >
> > > > > > your machine might be different, but the usb scanner should
> > > > > > come up as a device somewhere in /dev/bus/usb
> > > > > >
> > > > > > so then you could have a terminal open, run the cat command
> > > > > > and then control your scanner with whatever software you
> > > > > > have on your computer to scan images or something like that.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > its not very elegant, but you might get some noise out of
> > > > > > it.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > 2010/11/11 João Mário <[hidden email]>
> > > > > >
> > > > > > On Thu, 11 Nov 2010 23:45:13 +0000
> > > > > >> Rob Myers <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >> > On 11/11/2010 11:29 PM, esphera wrote:
> > > > > >> > >
> > > > > >> > > Just wondering that you might understand me wrong the
> > > > > >> > > previous post. I want to know how can I make a
> > > > > >> > > scanner's input data, transformed into sound?
> > > > > >> > >
> > > > > >> > > I had some advices such as "hack the drivers" or "you
> > > > > >> > > can do it with puredata"
> > > > > >> > >
> > > > > >> > > but I would really like to know how?
> > > > > >> > >
> > > > > >> > > thanks very much
> > > > > >> > >
> > > > > >> > > p.s.: I already use arss and enscribe software. but I
> > > > > >> > > want hardware stuff.
> > > > > >> >
> > > > > >> > I don't think you'll be able to just do it with pure
> > > > > >> > hardware. Every scanner has a commmunication protocol,
> > > > > >> > even old-fashioned parallel port scanners. You need at
> > > > > >> > least something like an Arduino to send the commands the
> > > > > >> > scanner is listening for to start it scanning.
> > > > > >> >
> > > > > >> > Which isn't really related to pure:dyne...
> > > > > >> >
> > > > > >> > - Rob.
> > > > > >> >
> > > > > >> > ---
> > > > > >> > [hidden email]
> > > > > >> > http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> > > > > >> > irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >> It certainly isn't related to p:d but I thought that p:d
> > > > > >> community would fit in this kind of project... so I ask for
> > > > > >> opinion
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >> @grant centauri - what those commands do?
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >> ---
> > > > > >> [hidden email]
> > > > > >> http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> > > > > >> irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > >
> > > > yes it's exactly that! :) like arss or enscribe (maybe this
> > > > software can be taken as study?..)
> > > > I don't know as I'm from image and type cult rather than
> > > > programming. I do have a strong and growing interest in
> > > > electronics and programming thanks to puredyne! and I would
> > > > like very much to see this work as a kind of instrument with
> > > > some controls over the speed of scan light or sensitivity... I
> > > > want to go that way if you read me. probably with pd and some
> > > > midi controllers?
> > > >
> > > > ---
> > > > [hidden email]
> > > > http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> > > > irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> > > >
> >
> > hey man thanks for your time!
> >
> > you really did touch the G point, the question of how data is mapped
> > has been revolving on my head. But then I think that the image as
> > spectogram is nice for what i'm looking for because I want to
> > actually see what kind of imagery makes what kind of sound (so that
> > my images production affects sound production and viceversa) but
> > then urges another question: I think the synthesis type is the
> > thing that i'm missing in understanding. arss uses both sine and
> > noise synthesis. enscribe i'm not sure. I got in touch with the
> > creator and all he said to me was :
> >
> > "A lot more time and energy has gone into ARSS, I think they use
> > additive synthesis instead of iFFT, so the architectures are
> > completely different. enscribe was never intended for synthesis,
> > just as a way to hide images inside songs.
> >
> > http://photosounder.com/examples.php also looks pretty cool, and
> > there's a free demo."
> >
> > What I said to him was that I like arss's the most for the kind of
> > clean sound results that it produced, but enscribe offers color
> > mapping related to panning and stuff, and that a fusion of both
> > would be perfect. But, I can't do it and i don't have the time to
> > study about it.
> >
> > So concluding this tought, I want to know what kind of synthesis is
> > more "pure" to what i'm looking for as a kind of synesthesia thing
> > you see?
> >
> > Thanks a lot one more time for your time! I really expect more
> > ideas :)
> >
> > ---
> > [hidden email]
> > http://identi.ca/group/puredyne
> > irc://irc.goto10.org/puredyne
> >

hey man!

the thing is i'm in europe... portugal to be precise...
and if you could explain me better that granular synthesis thing...
cause i'm a bit noob on sound matters...

also I thought of getting the code of the image file (like... some sort
of code that builds the image file ?) and then bringin' that code to a
matrix of kind of... groove pattern for vinyl cut you know... I
dunno... just guessing

---
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